Monday, November 28, 2011

Unit 3 Study Guide Answers

1. The quartering act was an act of British Parliament requiring the colonists to house British Redcoats stationed in America.
2. The Sugar Act was a tax on sugar imported to the colonies.
3. The Stamp Act required the purchase of specially stamped paper for all newspapers, legal documents, licenses, insurance papers, ship’s papers, and even playing cards and dice.
4. Sam Adams was a representative from Massachusetts in the 1st and 2nd Continental Congresses and the supposed leader of the Sons of Liberty.
5. The Declaratory Act informed the colonists that parliament had the "supreme authority to govern the colonies in all cases whatsoever."
6. The Townshend Acts were taxes on imported items to the colonies such as lead, paper, paint, tea, & glass.
7. The Writs of Assistance were pieces of paper gave Redcoats search warrants to enter American homes and look for smuggled goods.
8. The Daughters of Liberty were an anti-British secret society of women.
9. The Boston Massacre is best described as when a group of Redcoats fired into a crowd of Americans on March 5, 1770, five Americans were left dead and a court case followed.
10. John Adams represented the British redcoats and Captain Prescott in the court case that followed the Boston Massacre.
11. Loyalists were Americans that supported KG3 and England.
12. The Second Continental Congress was our wartime government.
13. George Washington was a representative from Virginia to the Second Continental Congress who was elected to be the Commander and Chief of the continental Army.
14. The Olive Branch petition was the 2nd continental Congresses last attempt to talk KG3 into restoring harmony between Britain and America.
15. Washington planned to steal the cannons from Ft. Ticonderoga and use them to free Boston of British occupation.
16. Common Sense was a pamphlet published by Thomas Paine that convinced Americans to support independent.
17. Thomas Jefferson was a representative to the 2nd Continental Congress from Virginia who was chosen to compose the Declaration of Independence.
18. The drafters of the D.o.I. knew that the Southern states would never ratify a document condemning slavery.
19. Locke's theory on Natural Rights being attacked by KG3 is the main argument in the document.
20. The signers of the DOI would be hung.
21. King George III and Parliament attempted to smooth over the Native - English relations by publishing the Proclamation Line of 1763 after the French & Indian War. The line kept Americans from settling West of the Appalachian Mountains.
22. The English was trying to pay off their French and Indian War debt.
23. Americans believed that they were being taxed by Parliament yet had no one representing them in Parliament.
24. The Sons of Liberty made up America's first espionage (spy) network.
25. The Sons of Liberty worked hard to keep people from buying and distributing British goods in America. This method of hurting KG3’s piggy bank is known as boycotting.
26. KG3 is known by the English historical texts as "The Mad King" & "The King That Lost America".
27. Crispus Attucks was the first death of the American Revolution
28. The British were sent to capture Sam Adams, John Hancock, and destroy Patriot military supplies in Concord.
29. Patriots were pro American/anti-KG3 people living in the colonies.
30. John Hancock was the President of the 2nd continental Congress and a representative of Massachusetts.
31. KG3 sent the Congress back a letter stating that the members of Congress would be hanged if they did not "cease in their traitorous behavior."
32. The Massachusetts Militia was adopted as our first American army.
33. The Massachusetts Militia were renamed the continental Army.
34. Lee's resolution stated that, "Resolved, That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved."
35. Thomas Jefferson was chosen to draft the document because he was from Virginia and he was an excellent writer.
36. Unalienable rights are rights that the government cannot take from you.

Monday, October 10, 2011

Unit 2 Study Guide Answers

1. Roanoke
2. Virginia
3. This is your opinion on what you think happened to the Lost Colony of Roanoke
4. Jamestown
5. Tobacco, positives: made lots of money for England/ negatives:people die every year of tobacco related cancer
6. Pocahontas, her marriage to John Rolfe brought peace to the Jamestown colony and allowed it to survive.
7. They were so busy looking for gold (to get rich), they didn't worry about planting crops or building proper houses to survive the winter.
8. Self-Government system. This was the first ever use of self government in America
9. The Pilgrims were on a religious journey and that is why they get the name Pilgrim.
10. They sailed across the Atlantic on the Mayflower.
11. The Mayflower Compact
12. Separatists and Puritans. Puritans wanted to purify the Church of England while the Separatists wanted to separate from it.
13. Work Ethic, Value in Education, Representative Government
14. African Slaves
15. King George II
16. Quakers because they said it was un Christian and immoral.
17. Quakers started baptizing Africans which gave them Christian status kept some people from using them as slaves.
18. Franklin stove, lightning rod, bi-focals, daylight savings,
19. Life, Liberty, Property
20. The Albany Plan of the Union
21. They did not want to give up control of their own affairs
22. The Treaty of Paris(1763)
23. Increased the British empire and ended all French control in America
24. The Proclamation of 1763
25. it forbade the colonists from settling West of the Appalachian Mountains.

Monday, August 29, 2011

UNIT 1 TEST ON THURSDAY

The First Unit Test is coming up. We have the beginnings of colonial slavery in the Americas to finish and then begin the study guide.
Monday-Finish Unit 1 notes
Tuesday-Work on Study Guide
Wednesday-Jeopardy
Thursday-TEST
Friday- No School

Saturday, May 14, 2011

Ryan Grant takes issue with Adrian Peterson’s slavery comment

The minute we saw Adrian Peterson compare the plight of the NFL player to “modern-day slavery,” we knew it was a comment that would get attention.

It didn’t take long for another player to take issue with it.

“I have to totally disagree with Adrian Peterson’s comparison to this situation being Modern day slavery. . . false,” Packers running back Ryan Grant wrote on Twitter. “Their is unfortunately actually still slavery existing in our world.. Literal modern day slavery.. That was a very misinformed statement. I understand what point he was trying to make.. I just feel like he should have been advised a little differently.”

Peterson will be given the chance to clarify his comments, and we’re sure he’ll put it into better context. For now, it looks like another comment to add to the mix from players and owners that lacks perspective.

We keep hearing about this fight in the context of future generations of players. Of fighting for rights.

Let’s just call it what it is: Both sides are trying to equitably distribute a lot of money. More money than previous generations of players could imagine.

That’s worth fighting over, but let’s stop trying to make it sound heroic.


Posted by Gregg Rosenthal on March 15, 2011, 3:44 PM EDT
http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/03/15/ryan-grant-takes-issue-with-adrian-petersons-slavery-comment/

End of the Year Details

Dear Parents,

We have a very limited amount of days left in school and your children have a lot of points available in the next 2 weeks.

Please understand, even though there is large amount of points that will be going into the grade book in the next two weeks, my students have had an enormous amount of time to work on the assignments being graded.

The Final Project (150 points) was given out weeks ago. On May 23rd (the project due date) the students will have had around a month to complete the project. They have had 3 full class periods to work on it in addition to the time outside of the classroom. Check the "class resources" link for detailed information on the projects.

Students were provided the study guide for the Final today. This will give them two weeks to complete this 108 point assignment that will probably be due the Thursday before the test. They can find all the answers in their notes, book, book website and the unit PowerPoint. I'll be handing back the study guides on Friday and posting the answers on my website so they can check over their answers.

The Final Exam is over Unit 6. We have covered this information for several weeks while reviewing past information from earlier in the unit on a DAILY basis. Almost everything on the test is covered in the notes we took in class or on the study guide.

Please feel free to e-mail me if you have any questions.

Thanks for all the support this year!

Monday, May 2, 2011

A Little Bit of Closure: The Death of Bin Laden

The President Makes the Historical Announcement:

The Story of What Happened:


Why This is a Big Deal:


Friday, April 29, 2011

CIVIL WAR THESPIAN

With his army surrounded, his men weak and exhausted, Robert E. Lee realized there was little choice but to consider the surrender of his Army to General Grant. After a series of notes between the two leaders, they agreed to meet on April 9, 1865, at the house of Wilmer McLean in the village of Appomattox Courthouse. The meeting lasted approximately two and one-half hours and at its conclusion the bloodiest conflict in the nation's history neared its end. Directions: Choose a partner and research eye witness accounts, newspaper articles, folklore, etc. of the Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse (the day the war ended). Then write a script and act out the famous day that ended the bloodiest war in U.S. History. The scene must be recorded with a video camera and uploaded onto YouTube.com so that we can watch it in class.

You all should thank Mr. Krysl on this one. He did the research for you. Here is the link to his page for the information you'll need. http://www.festus.k12.mo.us/webpages/tkrysl/index.cfm?subpage=584293

GONE WITH THE WIND MOVIE PROJECT

Watch the movie "Gone with the Wind" (the first 2 hours of it until the war is over) and make a timeline of the events of the Civil War that are discussed in the movie and record the characters' reactions to these events.

***OR***

Watch the movie "Gone with the Wind" and discuss five ways Scarlett's life is affected by the war, giving specific details from the movie. (or ways any of the characters' lives are affected)

Here is information about the movie:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0031381/

This is a good site for analyzing the different characters..
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/gonewith/canalysis.html

Watch the ORIGINAL trailer

JOHN BROWN COMIC

In the 1850’s, an abolitionist named John Brown is said to have sworn to do everything in his power to destroy slavery and help save the unfortunate enslaved people. He helped defend free-soilers in Bleeding Kansas during the violence over popular sovereignty, avenged the kidnapping of anti-slavery folks by the pro-slavery supporters, and even attempted to create a large slave revolt in Virginia. Directions: Research John Brown’s involvement at the Pottawatomie Massacre, the Battle of Osawatomie & Battle of Black Jack, AND/OR the Raid on Harper’s Ferry. Use the information you gathered to create a comic book of one OR even all the events. The comic must be at least 2 pages front & back with at least 2 pictures per page.






Links with information
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown/index.html

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/johnbrown.htm
http://www.kansashistory.us/pottamassacre.html
http://www.blackjackbattlefield.org/the%20battle.htm
http://www.blackjackbattlefield.org/blackjack_map_web.pdf
http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ks-osawatomiebattle.html
http://www.wvculture.org/history/jnobrown.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2940.html
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/contexts/kansas/jbrown.html
http://www2.iath.virginia.edu/jbrown/spectator.html#10/18

BASEBALL CARD PROJECT

You will complete a baseball card biography on a person from the Civil War & short research paragraphs about six other people. You will need to complete the following steps:
PART I - Short Research
Choose any 6 people from the list provided (or others from the Civil War). Identify each of the 6 people by describing their importance in history and their impact on the Civil War. Write a 6-8 descriptive sentences summarizing their MAIN importance IN YOUR OWN WORDS.
(Optional – include a computer generated or copied picture of each person). These should be neatly typed or printed and arranged with a title and pictures.

PART II – Baseball Card
Create a baseball card biography on one person from the attached list.


Making Your Baseball Card

Objective: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of leaders, events and concepts from the

Civil War. Students will view the impact of these people and events on US and World history. Each student will complete a baseball card biography on a person from the time period in history & short research paragraphs about six other people. Students will need to complete the following steps:

PART I - Short Research

Choose any 6 people from the list provided (or others from the time period that interest you). Identify each of the 6 people by describing their importance in history and their impact on the time period. Write 6-8 descriptive sentences summarizing their MAIN importance IN YOUR OWN WORDS. (Optional – include a computer generated or copied picture of each person). These should be neatly typed or printed and arranged with a title and pictures.

PART II – Baseball Card

Create a baseball card biography on one person from the attached list. The following are the direction for both sides of your baseball card.

FRONT OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the front of the card)

_____ 1) The name of your person.

_____ 2) A freehand drawing/painting of the person. You may ‘contract’ with someone else to do your drawing; however you must give them full credit for their work.

(on the front include a small drawing by: ….., if someone else does the drawing)

_____ 3) A symbol of which you feel best represent the person, person’s life, actions, or beliefs.

_____ 4) A motto, which you create for your person, based on the person’s life. This should reflect how the person changed or influenced history in the time period.

BACK OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the back of the card – you must put a title on each section)

_____ 1) Name of the person.

_____ 2) Date of birth and date of death.

_____ 3) A two sentence summary statement about the person’s main importance in U.S. History.

_____ 4) A life chronology (a time line) (at least 8 key events or turning points in the person life – not including birth & death)

_____ 5) briefly describe the person’s early life (childhood and education)

_____ 6) briefly describe the person’s political beliefs. (Liberal / conservative / radical – party affiliation)

_____ 7) Identify and explain the primary challenges the person faced in his professional AND private life.

_____ 8) Based on your research, identify two beliefs or values of this person (What was important to

this person?)

_____ 9) Write a statement expressing why this person was successful in gaining power?

_____ 10) based on your research, describe this person’s personality or character. Was he or she a good

person or bad? Why?

_____ 11) Find a well known quote by this person or an important quote about this person.

_____ 12) Write an 8 line poem about the person that highlights their major accomplishment(s).

Specifications for the Baseball Card:

1) This needs to be on a big piece of paper (11X17)
2) The writing need to be very neat or typed.
3) The back of the card needs to be arranged in organized blocks of information (as shown above). All info should not be in a long paragraph or in one big
list (ask Mr. K’s for an example). Each block needs a title – be creative with the titles!
4) Effort, neatness, and creativity will be taken into account when a grade in figured.
5) It is up to YOU to make arrangements to be successful. “I can’t draw” is not an acceptable excuse.

Specifications for Short Research:
1) These statements need to be typed or written neatly (writing on notebook paper is not acceptable) with pictures included. Please make these neat and organized. Follow the directions!



Mr. Krysl's History Class » Final Project Help! » Baseball Card Project Help

Baseball Card Project Help

Making Your Baseball Card



Objective: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of leaders, events and concepts from the

Civil War. Students will view the impact of these people and events on US and World history. Each student will complete a baseball card biography on a person from the time period in history & short research paragraphs about six other people. Students will need to complete the following steps:

PART I - Short Research

Choose any 6 people from the list provided (or others from the time period that interest you). Identify each of the 6 people by describing their importance in history and their impact on the time period. Write 6-8 descriptive sentences summarizing their MAIN importance IN YOUR OWN WORDS. (Optional – include a computer generated or copied picture of each person). These should be neatly typed or printed and arranged with a title and pictures.

PART II – Baseball Card

Create a baseball card biography on one person from the attached list. The following are the direction for both sides of your baseball card.

FRONT OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the front of the card)

_____ 1) The name of your person.

_____ 2) A freehand drawing/painting of the person. You may ‘contract’ with someone else to do your drawing; however you must give them full credit for their work.

(on the front include a small drawing by: ….., if someone else does the drawing)

_____ 3) A symbol of which you feel best represent the person, person’s life, actions, or beliefs.

_____ 4) A motto, which you create for your person, based on the person’s life. This should reflect how the person changed or influenced history in the time period.



BACK OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the back of the card – you must put a title on each section)



_____ 1) Name of the person.

_____ 2) Date of birth and date of death.

_____ 3) A two sentence summary statement about the person’s main importance in U.S. History.

_____ 4) A life chronology (a time line) (at least 8 key events or turning points in the person life – not including birth & death)

_____ 5) briefly describe the person’s early life (childhood and education)

_____ 6) briefly describe the person’s political beliefs. (Liberal / conservative / radical – party affiliation)

_____ 7) Identify and explain the primary challenges the person faced in his professional AND private life.

_____ 8) Based on your research, identify two beliefs or values of this person (What was important to

this person?)

_____ 9) Write a statement expressing why this person was successful in gaining power?

_____ 10) based on your research, describe this person’s personality or character. Was he or she a good

person or bad? Why?

_____ 11) Find a well known quote by this person or an important quote about this person.

_____ 12) Write an 8 line poem about the person that highlights their major accomplishment(s).








Specifications for the Baseball Card:

1) This needs to be on a big piece of paper (11X17)

2) The writing need to be very neat or typed.

3) The back of the card needs to be arranged in organized blocks of information (as shown above). All info should not be in a long paragraph or in one big

list (ask Mr. K’s for an example). Each block needs a title – be creative with the titles!

4) Effort, neatness, and creativity will be taken into account when a grade in figured.

5) It is up to YOU to make arrangements to be successful. “I can’t draw” is not an acceptable excuse.


Specifications for Short Research:

1) These statements need to be typed or written neatly (writing on notebook paper is not acceptable) with pictures included. Please make these neat and organized. Follow the directions!

The following are suggestions for you project – you are NOT limited to these people on this list – feel free to use other people. Make sure you can find enough information for your baseball card person.

Civil War (1 Baseball Card & 5 Short Research) (Chapters 15-18 in the textbook)

Abraham Lincoln
Robert E. Lee
Ulysses S. Grant
William Tecumseh Sherman
Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson
Abner Doubleday
Pierre G.T. Beauregard
Nathan Bedford Forrest
John Wilkes Booth
Jesse James
William Quantrill
Jefferson Davis
Alexander Hamilton Stephens
Ambrose E. Burnside
George Armstrong Custer
Thomas Ward Custer
John C. Freemont
George B. McClellan
Clara Barton
John Brown
Frederick Douglas
William Lloyd Garrison
David Glasgow Farragut
Harriet Tubman

Here are some LEGIT websites to find information about your people:

http://ehistory.osu.edu/uscw/features/people/list.cfm
http://www.civilwar.com/people.html
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAcivilwarC.htm

CIVIL WAR NEWS REPORTER

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free." Despite this expansive wording, the Emancipation Proclamation was limited in many ways. It applied only to states that had seceded from the Union, leaving slavery untouched in the loyal Border States. It also expressly exempted parts of the Confederacy that had already come under Northern control. Most important, the freedom it promised depended upon Union military victory. Although the Emancipation Proclamation did not end slavery in the nation, it captured the hearts and imagination of millions of Americans and fundamentally transformed the character of the war. Directions: Be a news reporter and "interview" a Southern sympathizer, a Northern sympathizer, a slave, and a free black and record their reactions to the Emancipation Proclamation

Here are so good links that describe the Emancipation Proclamation...

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h1549.html
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/emancipation_proclamation/
Actual text of the Emancipation Proclamation:

Whereas on the 22nd day of September, A.D. 1862, a proclamation
was issued by the President of the United States, containing,
among other things, the following, to wit:

"That on the 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, all persons held as
slaves within any State or designated part of a State the people
whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall
be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the executive
government of the United States, including the military and naval
authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such
persons and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any
of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

"That the executive will on the 1st day of January aforesaid,
by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any,
in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in
rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State
or the people thereof shall on that day be in good faith
represented in the Congress of the United States by members
chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified
voters of such States shall have participated shall, in the
absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive
evidence that such State and the people thereof are not then
in rebellion against the United States."

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United
States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-In-Chief
of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed
rebellion against the authority and government of the United States,
and as a fit and necessary war measure for supressing said
rebellion, do, on this 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, and in
accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the
full period of one hundred days from the first day above mentioned,
order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the
people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against
the United States the following, to wit:

Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard,
Palquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension,
Assumption, Terrebone, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans,
including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the
forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the
counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Morthhampton, Elizabeth City, York,
Princess Anne, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and
Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are for the present left
precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do
order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said
designated States and parts of States are, and henceforward shall
be, free; and that the Executive Government of the United States,
including the military and naval authorities thereof, will
recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to
abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and
I recommend to them that, in all case when allowed, they labor
faithfully for reasonable wages.

And I further declare and make known that such persons of
suitable condition will be received into the armed service of
the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and
other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice,
warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke
the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor
of Almighty God.

-President A Lincoln

HISTORICAL FIGURE POP ART

Pop Art is based on modern popular culture and the mass media. ASCII Art, a type of pop art, is a graphic design technique that consists of pictures pieced together from the printable characters used on the keyboard. Directions: Choose a memorable person from Unit 6 that you’d like to make ASCII art of. Find a speech that they wrote or quotes they said. Then find a picture of that historical figure. Use the website listed below and follow the directions to create your own ASCII Art. Then print the picture on a full page. If you run into any troubles you can visit our webpage’s more detailed instructions. You don’t have to use the website; you CAN make your ASCII art by hand.

If you do this project by hand you can print out a picture of the person and trace the details with the words of the speech on tracing paper(a blank sheet of copy paper would work too). If you use tracing paper please make a copy of the tracing paper for the final version you will turn in.

If you insist on using the web to do this project (instead of doing it by hand), here is the site you will need.
http://www.text-image.com/convert/

While using this site follow these directions:
1. Select the image you want to use for your project
2. Copy speech or quote and paste it in the "Characters:" section then select sequence
3. You can then mess with the font size, image width, background color
(This part may take a few tries to get the picture to look good)

Make sure your final copy is printed on a color printer if the picture is in color.




Some good examples of figures and their historical speeches are:
President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation
President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address
President Lincoln's "House Divided" Speech
Jefferson Davis' Farewell Address to the U.S. Senate January 21, 1861
President Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamation
President Lincoln's 1st AND 2nd Inaugural Address
President Lincoln's Speech on Reconstruction.
Check this site out for the text of each of these suggestions...
http://www.wildwestweb.net/cwdocs/cwdocuments.html

Civil War NCAA Mascot History

The history of mascots dates back to cavemen and early societies who hunted for their livelihood. Early accounts of masked creatures, often resembling animals were drawn or etched on cave walls and depicted in ancient art. Totem poles were filled with likenesses of animals in ancient cultures. These likenesses are much like the concept of the team mascots evident on football fields and basketball courts. Directions: Research the history and tradition revolving around the three North American Universities (Mizzou, Kansas, & North Carolina) that have Civil War history tied directly to their mascot. Create a visual aid for all to see what the mascots look like and list facts on how the mascots are directly related to the Civil War. Be sure to cite any source you use to find your information.

Check out these sites to read about the different mascots...

North Carolina Tarheels
http://alumni.unc.edu/article.aspx?sid=3516
http://gradschool.unc.edu/programs/weiss/interesting_place/history/tarheel.html
http://www.tarheelpress.com/Tarheel.html

Missouri Tigers
http://www.mutigers.com/trads/mascot-football-traditions.html
http://www.missouri.edu/about/history/mascot-colors.php
http://mizzouwire.missouri.edu/stories/2008/tiger-history/index.php
http://www.mcwm.org/history_mizzoukansas.html
Kansas Jayhawks
http://www.mcwm.org/history_mizzoukansas.html
http://www.kuathletics.com/trads/kan-trads.html
http://www.kuathletics.com/trads/kan-jayhawk-history.html

The role of women, slaves, and free blacks in the Civil War

Everybody knows the names of the famous men in the Civil War. Names like Lee, Grant, Lincoln, Davis, etc. People should also learn about the ways that women and African Americans (both free and enslaved) changed the outcome of the war. Directions: Research the roles that women and African Americans played in the American Civil War. Include facts about who they were, how they were involved, why they were involved, and how their involvement changed the outcome of the war.



Read the following essay about "The Cult of Domesticity and True Womanhood"
(http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/386/truewoman.html).
It describes the 19th century ideal of white middle and upper class womanhood as having four characteristics: piety, purity, submissiveness and domesticity.

Think about the following questions...
• How were women expected to behave at this time in history?
• What can you infer about the way men were expected to treat women?
• What were women not expected to do, and what were some of the negative consequences they faced if they broke with convention?
• To help in the war effort, what activities could be done in the home?
• What difficulties did women face if they ventured from their homes in order to work?


Women who actually did contribute to the war effort in some unusual ways:

Louis May Alcott – author and army nurse
Clara Barton – founder of the American Red Cross
Mary Ann Bickerdyke – hospital administrator
Belle Boyd – spy
Kady Brownell – "daughter" of a regiment
Lydia Maria Child – abolitionist and author
Dorothea Dix –Union superintendent of nurses
Rose O’Neal Greenhow - spy
Sarah Edmonds – fought disguised as a man
Charlotte Forten – taught in the Freedman’s schools
Angelina Grimke – antislavery activist
Susie Taylor King – escaped slave, teacher and nurse
Mary Livermore – hospital administrator
Harriet Beecher Stowe – author and anti-slavery activist
Sojourner Truth – abolitionist
Harriet Tubman – abolitionist
Loreta Velazquez – recruited her own battalion as a man


Useful Websites about women in the Civil War:
Women’s Activities During the Civil War: A Select List of Photographs, Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/107_civw.html)

Biography of Charlotte Forten(http://www.pbs.org/onlyateacher/charlotte.html), a free-born African American who went South during the war to educated freed slaves.

Rose O’Neal Greenhow Papers, Duke University(http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/greenhow/). Born in Maryland, O’Neal became a most effective spy for the Confederacy.

Biographies of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lydia Maria Child(http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lincolns/wworld/index.html) (author and anti-slavery activist), and an essay about medical care during the Civil War.

Lydia Maria Child’s letters to the Governor of Virginia, 1860 in American Memory.
(http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/murray:
@field(FLD001+07016677+):@@@$REF$)

Hearts at Home: Southern Women in the Civil War Era, University of Virginia. (http://www.lib.virginia.edu/speccol/exhibits/hearts/)

Women Soldiers of the Civil War, National Archives
(www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/
spring_1993_women_in_the_civil_war_1.html)

Role of African Americans in the Civil War

These are awesome webpages on the role that Black soldiers played.
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/blacks-civil-war/
http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/history/aa_history.htm
http://dburgin.tripod.com/blackman.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2967.html
http://www.coloradocollege.edu/Dept/HY/Hy243Ruiz/Research/civilwar.html
These are great articles on the role that slaves played in the war..
http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/02/20/spy.slaves/index.html
http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/stories/peopleplaces/harriettubman/

CIVIL WAR TECHNOLOGY

Civil War technology led historians to call the American Civil War the first modern war because of the array of new technology with which it was fought. The new technology ranged from weapons to cameras and telegraphs to tin cans. New weapons allowed soldiers to be more effective, but this new technology also meant that more soldiers were killed. Directions: Research the different forms of new technology used in the Civil War and discuss how each new form of technology affected the outcome of the War.

Here are some videos that will aid you in finding technology of the Civil War and information about each of them....















Saturday, April 16, 2011

Making Sense of the Research

Many legends of our nation's history are just that—legends, with no basis in established fact. But at least one Civil War legend may have just been upgraded in authenticity, thanks to an idea from a high-school student. This Science Update reveals how tales that may sound like supernatural fiction could actually be science fact.


Bill Martin and his family had heard some folklore about Civil War soldiers with glow-in-the-dark wounds who appeared to have better survival rates than soldiers with nonglowing wounds. Bill wondered if the subject of his mother's research—Photorhabdus luminescens, a bacteria that glows—could have caused the glowing wounds. He and his friend, Jonathan Curtis, performed research and experiments to find out if Photorhabdus luminescens was present at Shiloh, a particular battlefield where the glowing wounds were reported.

Bill and Jonathan not only discovered that the Photorhabdus luminescens bacteria was probably present at the Battle of Shiloh, but also found that it could indeed have grown on the bodies of the wounded soldiers, since their body temperatures were lowered by hypothermia (Photorhabdus luminescens does not grow at normal human body temperature).

With its focus on the P. Luminescens bacteria, this Science Update could lead to lessons and activities on bacteria and other microorganisms. In addition, the boys' research is an excellent example of students using the scientific method to answer a question or solve a problem. This Science Update, therefore, could be used as a starting-off point to show other students how scientists conduct research. This could be particularly useful at the middle-school and high-school levels, where students should become more sophisticated in conducting their investigations and where their experiments may last for weeks or more.

MAP TESTING OVER

Old News
This last week we finished MAP testing.
During the testing days I had kids take a little notes, but we also watch some of the TV movie series "Into the West."
Coming Soon
Our upcoming week will have plenty of note taking.
Students will soon have their Civil Tic-Tac-Toe Projects which allow them to choose which 3 assignments they'd like to do.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Discussions on Slavery

Today's Bellringer Question:What are a few examples of the stresses young slaves may have had that you do not?

There are many varieties of answers that students came up with. After the presentation for today, student have even more to add. Many students had no concept of why slaves couldn't just pick up and leave. I discussed their punishments and the fear that was instilled by many of the plantation overseers. Between the slave narrative by Solomon Northup and the PowerPoint students should have a much better understanding of the slave perspective.

Friday, April 1, 2011


TODAY is the last day to finish the ENRICHMENT ACTIVITY in class. They are due Monday! Then we begin the Civil War (Unit 6) by discussing in more detail the institution of slavery in the South. So note taking begins on Monday.

This Unit will be a little more exciting than the last couple. Students will get to learn about the mis-perceptions of the South, who's procrastination on getting rid of the abomination of slavery led to their fight for state rights. Though state rights are EXTREMELY important, we will see how the federal government CAN do the right thing.

The characters/historical figures are even more interesting. We'll cover General Ulysses Grant, who was know for his modesty, but was very rough on the edges. Classes will hopefully learn a lot from Frederick Douglass whom I quote him all the time. And of course the well talk about the tall guy out of Illinois, Abraham Lincoln, as well as William Sherman, Jefferson Davis, and Robert E. Lee.

Monday, March 28, 2011

This week we have the Unit 5 Test



MON.
Our study guide has been handed out for this Unit and will be due the day of the Test. The students have almost the entire class period to work on it.
TUES.
Mr. Krysl's class will be facing off against mine Tuesday in a game of Jeopardy over the test material. Depending on how hard the students work, the study guide answers may be posted on our websites around 8pm.
WED.
We will be testing Wednesday and the study guides will be graded. Study guides are a 100pts and students may only obtain half credit if turned in late.
THURS.
We will be enrichment for students that mastered the material and re-teaching of certain topics for those who did not master material.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Finals Week

Social Studies will not have a final this week. We will be using the next 2 days 90 minute classes to get caught up in notes. I'm hoping to have all grades into the system by next Monday. [REMINDER: There has been 2 extra credit opportunities this quarter alone AND the book club has been available all year]

Right now in class we are covering westward expansion and manifest destiny. We will be heading towards Texan Independence and their joining of the United States by Thursday.


I'll be posting a link to my page before the test with uploads for the PowerPoint and the notepacket.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

ANDREW JACKSON on History Channel


The last 3 days in class we have watch a series of videos that review, add to, and enrich the students knowledge of mainly Andrew Jackson, but also the War of 1812, the elections of 1824 and 1828, as well as the issues Jackson and America faced during his presidency.

Thursday, March 10, 2011

CLASS UPDATE!!!


TEST TOMORROW OVER THE 1830 MAP of the NORTH AMERICA

The Map that was assigned on Tuesday will be due Friday, the day of the test.
Students had two class periods to complete it and study; Test will be 60 points.

My class will be held in the science lab at least Thursday and Friday due to my smartboard bulb blowing up in PAWS class yesterday.

We have official started UNIT 5 and the notepackets have been handed out.

Monday, March 7, 2011

Starting Unit 5

Today we are starting the PowerPoint notes for the "Age of Jackson." We'll be covering Andrew Jackson's presidency, Manifest Destiny, and introducing topics of immigration and social reform. At the end of the Unit, before we get to the Civil War, the class will take a more detailed look at slavery.

On a side note, we have more than an hour of good social studies related videos up my class site. Here is the link: Coach Driemeier's Epic Videos

Oh here is a video of the Union Choir Trip. Festus kids can sing!

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Lewis & Clark

http://teachinghistory.org/history-content/ask-a-historian/24290
Question
I have heard that Spain was not happy about the Corps of Discovery expedition led by Lewis and Clark and that a group of soldiers and Comanches was twice sent out to stop them. Can you give me more information about these efforts including who led the detachment of soldiers, or point me in the direction of a website or book that would have this information?

Answer
The Spanish believed that any American expedition into the Louisiana Territory would lead to attempts to conquer Spanish territories to the west and south. President Jefferson, in fact, did believe that the United States would eventually expand across the continent out to the Pacific Ocean, and he had long planned in secret for at least one expedition of explorers to be sent out to the far west, even before he acted on the fortuitous opportunity to purchase the Louisiana Territory from France (which had just reacquired it from the King of Spain).
President Jefferson, in fact, did believe that the United States would eventually expand across the continent out to the Pacific Ocean
Merriwether Lewis and William Clark set out into the Louisiana Territory just as it was being officially turned over to the United States in early 1804 (the Purchase had been made in 1803). But the borders of the territory had not yet been well determined and Spanish authorities in America had good reason to suspect that the expedition would intrude into tenuously held Spanish territory. They also suspected, rightly, that the expedition was not just a matter of satisfying Jefferson’s scientific curiosity about the region, but that the expedition would also attempt to turn the Indian tribes they encountered against the Spanish and make them friendly toward the United States for both military and trading purposes.

Spanish Attempts to Intercept the Expedition
On March 5, 1804, Sebastiàn Calvo de la Puerta y O’Farril, marqués de Casa Calvo, the former Spanish governor of Louisiana, who was remaining in New Orleans to serve on the boundary commission that was to demarcate the Louisiana Territory, sent a letter to Nemesio Salcedo, Commandant General of the Interior Provinces in Chihuahua, warning him about the expedition and instructing Salcedo to send out a force to intercept and arrest the explorers. Delays followed, but on May 3, Salcedo ordered the Governor of New Mexico, Fernando de Chacón, to dispatch a force to find Lewis and Clark, who had already begun their journey four months before. Chacón sent out a party headed by two frontiersmen, Pedro Vial and José Jarvet, who led a force of 52 soldiers, Spanish settlers, and Indians, from Santa Fe on August 1. By September 3, they reached a large Pawnee settlement on the Platte River in central Nebraska. There, they assiduously distributed presents to the local chiefs and learned that American “traders” had lately been in the area. In fact, Lewis and Clark’s expedition had passed that way, but by the time that Vial and Jarvet reached the Platte, the Corps of Discovery was already far to the north, poling up the Missouri. Unable to get a clear idea of where Lewis and Clark were (actually, they were only about 100 miles away), Vial and Jarvet returned to New Mexico, arriving in Santa Fe on November 5.

Salcedo ordered Vial and Jarvet to conduct another attempt to counter Lewis and Clark in October 1805. They were given orders to negotiate with the Indians with the aim of forging close alliances with them so that the tribes would intercept Lewis and Clark upon their return journey. Vial and Jarvet set out from Santa Fe with about 100 men, soldiers, traders, and militia, but when they reached the north bank of the Arkansas River on November 6, they were attacked by a force of Pawnee, and had to return to Santa Fe. In April 1806, Vial led a third force, this time numbering about 300, on a similar mission to make Indian allies among the Pawnee, but his men soon turned against him and deserted, and he returned again to Santa Fe.
Melgares’ mission was to impress the wavering Indians who had been allied to Spain
In June, Salcedo dispatched another force from Santa Fe under the command of Lieutenant Facundo Melgares. Melgares had about 600 men under his command composed of 105 soldiers, 400 militiamen, and about 100 Comanches, all accompanied by nearly 2000 horses and mules. It was the largest military force that Spanish authorities ever sent out into the Plains. Melgares’ mission was to impress the wavering Indians who had been allied to Spain until then and to repel or apprehend any American exploring expeditions it could find, including the one under Lewis and Clark.

Hampered by the Pawnees’ suspicions and opposition, Melgares’ formidable but unwieldy force did not succeed in reaching the Missouri River, where it might have encamped and encountered Lewis and Clark on their return trip. The Corps of Discovery reached St. Louis on September 23, 1806, and Melgares and his men returned to Santa Fe the following month.

3/3/11 Debates

We almost didn't have our 1st Amendment debates today because I am sick. I tried to call in, but we had no luck on finding a sub so I decided to man-up and stay. Overall the kids did well. I had a few groups that were not prepared at all and their grades will show it. I have a couple groups that did a great job. The biggest problem was the students not realizing that the debate is between the two in front of the class, not the debaters and themselves.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

In Class This Week

In class this week we divided my and Mr. K's classes into two groups. The kids that mastered the material for the Test get enrichment activities to go further in depth on the topics of Unit 4. The students that did not master the test got to go over questions they missed and re-learn topics that they must know to move on to the next Unit.

Sunday, February 27, 2011

NEWS

1st Amendment Project due date has been moved to Tuesday.
Debates will be on Wednesday.
Enrichment or test corrections are Monday/Tuesday.
We'll start Unit 5 on Thursday.

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Dear Parents,

The next few weeks your students will have over 200pts available to earn. This is very important considering the first few weeks they've only had around 60pts. Today we will be handing out a study guide for the Unit 4 test and tomorrow the students will play a Jeopardy review game (winners get bonus points). The study guide will be due Friday, the day of the test. On Monday the students will be expected to have their 1st Amendment Project completely finished. The 1st Amendment Project assigned last Monday (giving them 2 weeks to get it finished).

Also, I've just began working on my class website through the school. I will also begin updating my class blog at least weekly. I have downloadable handouts for the study guide and the project already up if your child forgets to bring them home. From the website just click on "class resources" then click on subpage "Unit 4."

Sunday, February 20, 2011

My New Class Page!!!

Here is a link to my new school sponsored class page that I'll have and it'll use this blog.
http://www.festus.k12.mo.us/webpages/hdriemeyer/index.cfm?subpage=368316
The following are features of the new site above!
FORMS- ACTUAL DOWNLOADABLE worksheets, project instructions, powerpoint slides, study guides, ETC.
LINKS- to our text book page, class facebook page, twitter account, and other acceptable history related links
BLOG- This is an update of what we are doing and/or learning in the classroom

CLASS RESOURCES- Resources that includes any forms from the beginning of school, Unit Breakdowns for the parents, AND EXTRA CREDIT INFO for the History Book Club.
SLIDE SHOW- Pictures of History
QUIZZES- quizzes for home
MESSAGE BOARD- Question, answer, reply; have conversations over topics for alternative assignments and earn points
WHO IS MY TEACHER?- My bio and info about me