Friday, April 29, 2011

CIVIL WAR THESPIAN

With his army surrounded, his men weak and exhausted, Robert E. Lee realized there was little choice but to consider the surrender of his Army to General Grant. After a series of notes between the two leaders, they agreed to meet on April 9, 1865, at the house of Wilmer McLean in the village of Appomattox Courthouse. The meeting lasted approximately two and one-half hours and at its conclusion the bloodiest conflict in the nation's history neared its end. Directions: Choose a partner and research eye witness accounts, newspaper articles, folklore, etc. of the Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse (the day the war ended). Then write a script and act out the famous day that ended the bloodiest war in U.S. History. The scene must be recorded with a video camera and uploaded onto YouTube.com so that we can watch it in class.

You all should thank Mr. Krysl on this one. He did the research for you. Here is the link to his page for the information you'll need. http://www.festus.k12.mo.us/webpages/tkrysl/index.cfm?subpage=584293

GONE WITH THE WIND MOVIE PROJECT

Watch the movie "Gone with the Wind" (the first 2 hours of it until the war is over) and make a timeline of the events of the Civil War that are discussed in the movie and record the characters' reactions to these events.

***OR***

Watch the movie "Gone with the Wind" and discuss five ways Scarlett's life is affected by the war, giving specific details from the movie. (or ways any of the characters' lives are affected)

Here is information about the movie:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0031381/

This is a good site for analyzing the different characters..
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/gonewith/canalysis.html

Watch the ORIGINAL trailer

JOHN BROWN COMIC

In the 1850’s, an abolitionist named John Brown is said to have sworn to do everything in his power to destroy slavery and help save the unfortunate enslaved people. He helped defend free-soilers in Bleeding Kansas during the violence over popular sovereignty, avenged the kidnapping of anti-slavery folks by the pro-slavery supporters, and even attempted to create a large slave revolt in Virginia. Directions: Research John Brown’s involvement at the Pottawatomie Massacre, the Battle of Osawatomie & Battle of Black Jack, AND/OR the Raid on Harper’s Ferry. Use the information you gathered to create a comic book of one OR even all the events. The comic must be at least 2 pages front & back with at least 2 pictures per page.






Links with information
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown/index.html

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/johnbrown.htm
http://www.kansashistory.us/pottamassacre.html
http://www.blackjackbattlefield.org/the%20battle.htm
http://www.blackjackbattlefield.org/blackjack_map_web.pdf
http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ks-osawatomiebattle.html
http://www.wvculture.org/history/jnobrown.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2940.html
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/contexts/kansas/jbrown.html
http://www2.iath.virginia.edu/jbrown/spectator.html#10/18

BASEBALL CARD PROJECT

You will complete a baseball card biography on a person from the Civil War & short research paragraphs about six other people. You will need to complete the following steps:
PART I - Short Research
Choose any 6 people from the list provided (or others from the Civil War). Identify each of the 6 people by describing their importance in history and their impact on the Civil War. Write a 6-8 descriptive sentences summarizing their MAIN importance IN YOUR OWN WORDS.
(Optional – include a computer generated or copied picture of each person). These should be neatly typed or printed and arranged with a title and pictures.

PART II – Baseball Card
Create a baseball card biography on one person from the attached list.


Making Your Baseball Card

Objective: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of leaders, events and concepts from the

Civil War. Students will view the impact of these people and events on US and World history. Each student will complete a baseball card biography on a person from the time period in history & short research paragraphs about six other people. Students will need to complete the following steps:

PART I - Short Research

Choose any 6 people from the list provided (or others from the time period that interest you). Identify each of the 6 people by describing their importance in history and their impact on the time period. Write 6-8 descriptive sentences summarizing their MAIN importance IN YOUR OWN WORDS. (Optional – include a computer generated or copied picture of each person). These should be neatly typed or printed and arranged with a title and pictures.

PART II – Baseball Card

Create a baseball card biography on one person from the attached list. The following are the direction for both sides of your baseball card.

FRONT OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the front of the card)

_____ 1) The name of your person.

_____ 2) A freehand drawing/painting of the person. You may ‘contract’ with someone else to do your drawing; however you must give them full credit for their work.

(on the front include a small drawing by: ….., if someone else does the drawing)

_____ 3) A symbol of which you feel best represent the person, person’s life, actions, or beliefs.

_____ 4) A motto, which you create for your person, based on the person’s life. This should reflect how the person changed or influenced history in the time period.

BACK OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the back of the card – you must put a title on each section)

_____ 1) Name of the person.

_____ 2) Date of birth and date of death.

_____ 3) A two sentence summary statement about the person’s main importance in U.S. History.

_____ 4) A life chronology (a time line) (at least 8 key events or turning points in the person life – not including birth & death)

_____ 5) briefly describe the person’s early life (childhood and education)

_____ 6) briefly describe the person’s political beliefs. (Liberal / conservative / radical – party affiliation)

_____ 7) Identify and explain the primary challenges the person faced in his professional AND private life.

_____ 8) Based on your research, identify two beliefs or values of this person (What was important to

this person?)

_____ 9) Write a statement expressing why this person was successful in gaining power?

_____ 10) based on your research, describe this person’s personality or character. Was he or she a good

person or bad? Why?

_____ 11) Find a well known quote by this person or an important quote about this person.

_____ 12) Write an 8 line poem about the person that highlights their major accomplishment(s).

Specifications for the Baseball Card:

1) This needs to be on a big piece of paper (11X17)
2) The writing need to be very neat or typed.
3) The back of the card needs to be arranged in organized blocks of information (as shown above). All info should not be in a long paragraph or in one big
list (ask Mr. K’s for an example). Each block needs a title – be creative with the titles!
4) Effort, neatness, and creativity will be taken into account when a grade in figured.
5) It is up to YOU to make arrangements to be successful. “I can’t draw” is not an acceptable excuse.

Specifications for Short Research:
1) These statements need to be typed or written neatly (writing on notebook paper is not acceptable) with pictures included. Please make these neat and organized. Follow the directions!



Mr. Krysl's History Class » Final Project Help! » Baseball Card Project Help

Baseball Card Project Help

Making Your Baseball Card



Objective: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of leaders, events and concepts from the

Civil War. Students will view the impact of these people and events on US and World history. Each student will complete a baseball card biography on a person from the time period in history & short research paragraphs about six other people. Students will need to complete the following steps:

PART I - Short Research

Choose any 6 people from the list provided (or others from the time period that interest you). Identify each of the 6 people by describing their importance in history and their impact on the time period. Write 6-8 descriptive sentences summarizing their MAIN importance IN YOUR OWN WORDS. (Optional – include a computer generated or copied picture of each person). These should be neatly typed or printed and arranged with a title and pictures.

PART II – Baseball Card

Create a baseball card biography on one person from the attached list. The following are the direction for both sides of your baseball card.

FRONT OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the front of the card)

_____ 1) The name of your person.

_____ 2) A freehand drawing/painting of the person. You may ‘contract’ with someone else to do your drawing; however you must give them full credit for their work.

(on the front include a small drawing by: ….., if someone else does the drawing)

_____ 3) A symbol of which you feel best represent the person, person’s life, actions, or beliefs.

_____ 4) A motto, which you create for your person, based on the person’s life. This should reflect how the person changed or influenced history in the time period.



BACK OF THE CARD

(These features must be included on the back of the card – you must put a title on each section)



_____ 1) Name of the person.

_____ 2) Date of birth and date of death.

_____ 3) A two sentence summary statement about the person’s main importance in U.S. History.

_____ 4) A life chronology (a time line) (at least 8 key events or turning points in the person life – not including birth & death)

_____ 5) briefly describe the person’s early life (childhood and education)

_____ 6) briefly describe the person’s political beliefs. (Liberal / conservative / radical – party affiliation)

_____ 7) Identify and explain the primary challenges the person faced in his professional AND private life.

_____ 8) Based on your research, identify two beliefs or values of this person (What was important to

this person?)

_____ 9) Write a statement expressing why this person was successful in gaining power?

_____ 10) based on your research, describe this person’s personality or character. Was he or she a good

person or bad? Why?

_____ 11) Find a well known quote by this person or an important quote about this person.

_____ 12) Write an 8 line poem about the person that highlights their major accomplishment(s).








Specifications for the Baseball Card:

1) This needs to be on a big piece of paper (11X17)

2) The writing need to be very neat or typed.

3) The back of the card needs to be arranged in organized blocks of information (as shown above). All info should not be in a long paragraph or in one big

list (ask Mr. K’s for an example). Each block needs a title – be creative with the titles!

4) Effort, neatness, and creativity will be taken into account when a grade in figured.

5) It is up to YOU to make arrangements to be successful. “I can’t draw” is not an acceptable excuse.


Specifications for Short Research:

1) These statements need to be typed or written neatly (writing on notebook paper is not acceptable) with pictures included. Please make these neat and organized. Follow the directions!

The following are suggestions for you project – you are NOT limited to these people on this list – feel free to use other people. Make sure you can find enough information for your baseball card person.

Civil War (1 Baseball Card & 5 Short Research) (Chapters 15-18 in the textbook)

Abraham Lincoln
Robert E. Lee
Ulysses S. Grant
William Tecumseh Sherman
Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson
Abner Doubleday
Pierre G.T. Beauregard
Nathan Bedford Forrest
John Wilkes Booth
Jesse James
William Quantrill
Jefferson Davis
Alexander Hamilton Stephens
Ambrose E. Burnside
George Armstrong Custer
Thomas Ward Custer
John C. Freemont
George B. McClellan
Clara Barton
John Brown
Frederick Douglas
William Lloyd Garrison
David Glasgow Farragut
Harriet Tubman

Here are some LEGIT websites to find information about your people:

http://ehistory.osu.edu/uscw/features/people/list.cfm
http://www.civilwar.com/people.html
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAcivilwarC.htm

CIVIL WAR NEWS REPORTER

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free." Despite this expansive wording, the Emancipation Proclamation was limited in many ways. It applied only to states that had seceded from the Union, leaving slavery untouched in the loyal Border States. It also expressly exempted parts of the Confederacy that had already come under Northern control. Most important, the freedom it promised depended upon Union military victory. Although the Emancipation Proclamation did not end slavery in the nation, it captured the hearts and imagination of millions of Americans and fundamentally transformed the character of the war. Directions: Be a news reporter and "interview" a Southern sympathizer, a Northern sympathizer, a slave, and a free black and record their reactions to the Emancipation Proclamation

Here are so good links that describe the Emancipation Proclamation...

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h1549.html
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/emancipation_proclamation/
Actual text of the Emancipation Proclamation:

Whereas on the 22nd day of September, A.D. 1862, a proclamation
was issued by the President of the United States, containing,
among other things, the following, to wit:

"That on the 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, all persons held as
slaves within any State or designated part of a State the people
whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall
be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the executive
government of the United States, including the military and naval
authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such
persons and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any
of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.

"That the executive will on the 1st day of January aforesaid,
by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any,
in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in
rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State
or the people thereof shall on that day be in good faith
represented in the Congress of the United States by members
chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified
voters of such States shall have participated shall, in the
absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive
evidence that such State and the people thereof are not then
in rebellion against the United States."

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United
States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-In-Chief
of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed
rebellion against the authority and government of the United States,
and as a fit and necessary war measure for supressing said
rebellion, do, on this 1st day of January, A.D. 1863, and in
accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the
full period of one hundred days from the first day above mentioned,
order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the
people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against
the United States the following, to wit:

Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard,
Palquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension,
Assumption, Terrebone, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans,
including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the
forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the
counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Morthhampton, Elizabeth City, York,
Princess Anne, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and
Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are for the present left
precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.

And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do
order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said
designated States and parts of States are, and henceforward shall
be, free; and that the Executive Government of the United States,
including the military and naval authorities thereof, will
recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.

And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to
abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and
I recommend to them that, in all case when allowed, they labor
faithfully for reasonable wages.

And I further declare and make known that such persons of
suitable condition will be received into the armed service of
the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and
other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.

And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice,
warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke
the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor
of Almighty God.

-President A Lincoln

HISTORICAL FIGURE POP ART

Pop Art is based on modern popular culture and the mass media. ASCII Art, a type of pop art, is a graphic design technique that consists of pictures pieced together from the printable characters used on the keyboard. Directions: Choose a memorable person from Unit 6 that you’d like to make ASCII art of. Find a speech that they wrote or quotes they said. Then find a picture of that historical figure. Use the website listed below and follow the directions to create your own ASCII Art. Then print the picture on a full page. If you run into any troubles you can visit our webpage’s more detailed instructions. You don’t have to use the website; you CAN make your ASCII art by hand.

If you do this project by hand you can print out a picture of the person and trace the details with the words of the speech on tracing paper(a blank sheet of copy paper would work too). If you use tracing paper please make a copy of the tracing paper for the final version you will turn in.

If you insist on using the web to do this project (instead of doing it by hand), here is the site you will need.
http://www.text-image.com/convert/

While using this site follow these directions:
1. Select the image you want to use for your project
2. Copy speech or quote and paste it in the "Characters:" section then select sequence
3. You can then mess with the font size, image width, background color
(This part may take a few tries to get the picture to look good)

Make sure your final copy is printed on a color printer if the picture is in color.




Some good examples of figures and their historical speeches are:
President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation
President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address
President Lincoln's "House Divided" Speech
Jefferson Davis' Farewell Address to the U.S. Senate January 21, 1861
President Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamation
President Lincoln's 1st AND 2nd Inaugural Address
President Lincoln's Speech on Reconstruction.
Check this site out for the text of each of these suggestions...
http://www.wildwestweb.net/cwdocs/cwdocuments.html

Civil War NCAA Mascot History

The history of mascots dates back to cavemen and early societies who hunted for their livelihood. Early accounts of masked creatures, often resembling animals were drawn or etched on cave walls and depicted in ancient art. Totem poles were filled with likenesses of animals in ancient cultures. These likenesses are much like the concept of the team mascots evident on football fields and basketball courts. Directions: Research the history and tradition revolving around the three North American Universities (Mizzou, Kansas, & North Carolina) that have Civil War history tied directly to their mascot. Create a visual aid for all to see what the mascots look like and list facts on how the mascots are directly related to the Civil War. Be sure to cite any source you use to find your information.

Check out these sites to read about the different mascots...

North Carolina Tarheels
http://alumni.unc.edu/article.aspx?sid=3516
http://gradschool.unc.edu/programs/weiss/interesting_place/history/tarheel.html
http://www.tarheelpress.com/Tarheel.html

Missouri Tigers
http://www.mutigers.com/trads/mascot-football-traditions.html
http://www.missouri.edu/about/history/mascot-colors.php
http://mizzouwire.missouri.edu/stories/2008/tiger-history/index.php
http://www.mcwm.org/history_mizzoukansas.html
Kansas Jayhawks
http://www.mcwm.org/history_mizzoukansas.html
http://www.kuathletics.com/trads/kan-trads.html
http://www.kuathletics.com/trads/kan-jayhawk-history.html

The role of women, slaves, and free blacks in the Civil War

Everybody knows the names of the famous men in the Civil War. Names like Lee, Grant, Lincoln, Davis, etc. People should also learn about the ways that women and African Americans (both free and enslaved) changed the outcome of the war. Directions: Research the roles that women and African Americans played in the American Civil War. Include facts about who they were, how they were involved, why they were involved, and how their involvement changed the outcome of the war.



Read the following essay about "The Cult of Domesticity and True Womanhood"
(http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/386/truewoman.html).
It describes the 19th century ideal of white middle and upper class womanhood as having four characteristics: piety, purity, submissiveness and domesticity.

Think about the following questions...
• How were women expected to behave at this time in history?
• What can you infer about the way men were expected to treat women?
• What were women not expected to do, and what were some of the negative consequences they faced if they broke with convention?
• To help in the war effort, what activities could be done in the home?
• What difficulties did women face if they ventured from their homes in order to work?


Women who actually did contribute to the war effort in some unusual ways:

Louis May Alcott – author and army nurse
Clara Barton – founder of the American Red Cross
Mary Ann Bickerdyke – hospital administrator
Belle Boyd – spy
Kady Brownell – "daughter" of a regiment
Lydia Maria Child – abolitionist and author
Dorothea Dix –Union superintendent of nurses
Rose O’Neal Greenhow - spy
Sarah Edmonds – fought disguised as a man
Charlotte Forten – taught in the Freedman’s schools
Angelina Grimke – antislavery activist
Susie Taylor King – escaped slave, teacher and nurse
Mary Livermore – hospital administrator
Harriet Beecher Stowe – author and anti-slavery activist
Sojourner Truth – abolitionist
Harriet Tubman – abolitionist
Loreta Velazquez – recruited her own battalion as a man


Useful Websites about women in the Civil War:
Women’s Activities During the Civil War: A Select List of Photographs, Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/107_civw.html)

Biography of Charlotte Forten(http://www.pbs.org/onlyateacher/charlotte.html), a free-born African American who went South during the war to educated freed slaves.

Rose O’Neal Greenhow Papers, Duke University(http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/greenhow/). Born in Maryland, O’Neal became a most effective spy for the Confederacy.

Biographies of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lydia Maria Child(http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lincolns/wworld/index.html) (author and anti-slavery activist), and an essay about medical care during the Civil War.

Lydia Maria Child’s letters to the Governor of Virginia, 1860 in American Memory.
(http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/murray:
@field(FLD001+07016677+):@@@$REF$)

Hearts at Home: Southern Women in the Civil War Era, University of Virginia. (http://www.lib.virginia.edu/speccol/exhibits/hearts/)

Women Soldiers of the Civil War, National Archives
(www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/
spring_1993_women_in_the_civil_war_1.html)

Role of African Americans in the Civil War

These are awesome webpages on the role that Black soldiers played.
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/blacks-civil-war/
http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/history/aa_history.htm
http://dburgin.tripod.com/blackman.html
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2967.html
http://www.coloradocollege.edu/Dept/HY/Hy243Ruiz/Research/civilwar.html
These are great articles on the role that slaves played in the war..
http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/02/20/spy.slaves/index.html
http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/stories/peopleplaces/harriettubman/

CIVIL WAR TECHNOLOGY

Civil War technology led historians to call the American Civil War the first modern war because of the array of new technology with which it was fought. The new technology ranged from weapons to cameras and telegraphs to tin cans. New weapons allowed soldiers to be more effective, but this new technology also meant that more soldiers were killed. Directions: Research the different forms of new technology used in the Civil War and discuss how each new form of technology affected the outcome of the War.

Here are some videos that will aid you in finding technology of the Civil War and information about each of them....















Saturday, April 16, 2011

Making Sense of the Research

Many legends of our nation's history are just that—legends, with no basis in established fact. But at least one Civil War legend may have just been upgraded in authenticity, thanks to an idea from a high-school student. This Science Update reveals how tales that may sound like supernatural fiction could actually be science fact.


Bill Martin and his family had heard some folklore about Civil War soldiers with glow-in-the-dark wounds who appeared to have better survival rates than soldiers with nonglowing wounds. Bill wondered if the subject of his mother's research—Photorhabdus luminescens, a bacteria that glows—could have caused the glowing wounds. He and his friend, Jonathan Curtis, performed research and experiments to find out if Photorhabdus luminescens was present at Shiloh, a particular battlefield where the glowing wounds were reported.

Bill and Jonathan not only discovered that the Photorhabdus luminescens bacteria was probably present at the Battle of Shiloh, but also found that it could indeed have grown on the bodies of the wounded soldiers, since their body temperatures were lowered by hypothermia (Photorhabdus luminescens does not grow at normal human body temperature).

With its focus on the P. Luminescens bacteria, this Science Update could lead to lessons and activities on bacteria and other microorganisms. In addition, the boys' research is an excellent example of students using the scientific method to answer a question or solve a problem. This Science Update, therefore, could be used as a starting-off point to show other students how scientists conduct research. This could be particularly useful at the middle-school and high-school levels, where students should become more sophisticated in conducting their investigations and where their experiments may last for weeks or more.

MAP TESTING OVER

Old News
This last week we finished MAP testing.
During the testing days I had kids take a little notes, but we also watch some of the TV movie series "Into the West."
Coming Soon
Our upcoming week will have plenty of note taking.
Students will soon have their Civil Tic-Tac-Toe Projects which allow them to choose which 3 assignments they'd like to do.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Discussions on Slavery

Today's Bellringer Question:What are a few examples of the stresses young slaves may have had that you do not?

There are many varieties of answers that students came up with. After the presentation for today, student have even more to add. Many students had no concept of why slaves couldn't just pick up and leave. I discussed their punishments and the fear that was instilled by many of the plantation overseers. Between the slave narrative by Solomon Northup and the PowerPoint students should have a much better understanding of the slave perspective.

Friday, April 1, 2011


TODAY is the last day to finish the ENRICHMENT ACTIVITY in class. They are due Monday! Then we begin the Civil War (Unit 6) by discussing in more detail the institution of slavery in the South. So note taking begins on Monday.

This Unit will be a little more exciting than the last couple. Students will get to learn about the mis-perceptions of the South, who's procrastination on getting rid of the abomination of slavery led to their fight for state rights. Though state rights are EXTREMELY important, we will see how the federal government CAN do the right thing.

The characters/historical figures are even more interesting. We'll cover General Ulysses Grant, who was know for his modesty, but was very rough on the edges. Classes will hopefully learn a lot from Frederick Douglass whom I quote him all the time. And of course the well talk about the tall guy out of Illinois, Abraham Lincoln, as well as William Sherman, Jefferson Davis, and Robert E. Lee.